Jail - Spokane County

Spokane County Jail
1100 W. Mallon
Spokane, WA   99260-0320
(509) 477-2278


         “The County Jail should not be
the largest mental-health facility in the state.”

- Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich


  • All jail cells are maximum security, with arrests from murder to blue collar crimes.
  • Inmates are put under constant observation in cool down for the first 2 weeks, because this is the period of time with the highest rate of suicide.  Unfortunately, this is also the least opportunity for religious leaders to reach out to those
  • Education in jails reduces recidivism rates.  Our jail graduates an average of 68 inmates with their GED (General Equivalency Diploma) each year.  Inmates must pass 5 sections of the GED:  reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies.  Education helps the inmates rise out of the cycle of poverty and crime, giving them a chance to improve their lives. 
Statistics
  • The jail is designed to hold 483 inmates—but, it now averages 670 to 770. 
  • 20,000 arrested people pass through the Spokane County Jail every year. 
What You Can Do
  • Provide Community Service Opportunities.  Courts are allowed to convert up to 30 days of jail time (up to 240 hours) to community service.  Non-profit and government agencies may contact the Dept. of Corrections to participate in this program. 
  • Victims of crime who want to keep track of a suspect’s release dates and whereabouts, may access the list of men and women who have been booked into, or released from, the Spokane County Jail, Geiger Corrections Center, and those on home monitoring.  The Spokane County Sheriff’s Website is updated approximately four times a day:  Visit https://www.spokanecounty.org/352/Inmate-Roster

  • Success in other communities: 
    11.4 million Americans will cycle through about 3,100 jails this year. On average, they will stay for 23 days and about 95% of them will not go on to prison. This is an expensive problem, and data can be used to help solve it.

    The White House Data-Driven Justice Initiative focused on finding a solution. They figured out who the people in these jails are and then shared the information with police departments. Sharing spreadsheets is one of the solutions implemented by Miami-Dade, Florida. It cost $1.5 million to implement, but they saved $10 million in the first year.  “They closed a full jail, and a couple of years later they closed a second jail. Crime rates went down, officer-involved assaults went way down — the whole system worked." 

    Sharing spreadsheets in a secure way to protect privacy, is key to implementing this practice.  (Source:  Former U.S. Chief Data Scientist Dhanurjay “DJ” Patil, BYU Forum, February 13, 2018)